XRANK in SharePoint Search REST API

I work with SharePoint Search from some time now. Since many clients need assistance on Search optimization KQL is one of my best mates. Especially XRANK is very powerful function that leverage KQL capabilities but also enlarge its complexity. Anyway I feel quite sure about what we can achieve using KQL and how. However last week a colleague of mine asked me about what is proper syntax of XRANK in REST search query…and I was like “emmm…”.

There are many not obvious questions – which characters need to be encoded? Is the syntax the same as in common KQL query?

I did quick documentation check as well as googling for an answer but there was no satisfying results at all (if there is no answer in Stack Overflow the web contains no answer).

So this post is about clarification for XRANK syntax in REST API calls.

Use Search Query Tool

The old sentence says “Do not break open doors”. That’s why I did not investigate topic by myself trying different REST queries to SP Search. Instead I used great great great tool called Search Query Tool. It really makes your work with search easier and faster. You can build any kind of KQL query in it and it will be translated to REST query because it uses it to communicate with SharePoint.

So for instance if you want to execute following KQL query

*  XRANK(cb=1) Position:Manager

Its REST equivalent will be:

<SearchEndpointURL>?querytext=’*+XRANK(cb%3d1)+Position:Manager’

As you can see syntax is the same as in common KQL query however ‘=’ character has been encoded to URI format in order to be properly understood by browser and endpoint and any spaces has been replaced by “+”.

Complex XRANK queries

Remember that in order to build you must remember about proper use of parenthesis. For instance if you want to make multiple XRANK boosts you need to arrange them in following way:

(SearchQuery XRANK(cb=1) condition1) XRANK(cb=1) condition2

In other words, if you want to add boosting for position AND for date freshness your KQL will look like below:

(* XRANK(cb=1) Position:Manager) XRANK(cb=0.5) LastModifiedTime>{Today-365}

and your REST query text will be like following:

querytext='(*+XRANK(cb%3d1)+Position:Manager)+XRANK(cb%3d0.5)+LastModifiedTime>{Today-30}’

which gives you following results:

  • results older than 30 days and for person that position does not contain “Manager” in its name will get 0 ranking points
  • results modified less than 30 days ago and for person that position does contain “Manager” in its name will get 0.5 ranking points
  • results older than 30 days and for person that position does contain “Manager” in its name will get 1 ranking points
  • results modified less than 30 days ago and for person that position does not contain “Manager” in its name will get 1.5 ranking points

 

Hope it helps you in using XRANK and KQL in REST API queries.

 

Thanks & have a great day!

Week 4/2018

Hey,

I decided to post week updates less often, but more valuable. And this week I have something really worth of noting:

 

How to execute ANY SharePoint powershell command programmatically using C#

In one of my projects my team faced following challenges:

  • How to add query rules programmatically using C#
  • How to update thesaurus programmatically using C#

I tried to find information in official documentation but it was not very helpful neither was googling.

Powershell cmdlets to c# assembly mapping

In my team we were thinking what to do in this situation and one of my colleagues came with brilliant idea – he searched for PowerShell cmdlet in file explorer with searching in files content option turned on.

Result? What he found was exactly what we were looking for.

In location “C:\Program Files\Common Files\microsoft shared\Web Server Extensions\16\CONFIG\PowerShell\Registration” there is file named OSSSearchCmdlets.xml.

What it contains is xml structure with following structure:

       <ps:Cmdlet>

            <ps:VerbName>Get-SPEnterpriseSearchCrawlContentSource</ps:VerbName>

            <ps:ClassName>Microsoft.Office.Server.Search.Cmdlet.GetSearchCrawlContentSource</ps:ClassName>

            <ps:HelpFile>Microsoft.Office.Server.Search.dll-help.xml</ps:HelpFile>

        </ps:Cmdlet>

 

My eyes see this just as below:

       <PowershellToAssembllyMapping>

            <PowerShellCmdName>What-I-Have</PowerShellCmdName>

            <C#NameAndLocation>What-I-Am-Looking-For</C#NameAndLocation>

            <Whatever>Whatever.xml</Whatever>

        </PowershellToAssembllyMapping>

Maps for Search, WSS and many more

OSSSearchCmdlets.xml file contains ps cmdlets to .NET assemblies mapping only for SharePoint Search.

But in the same location there is also another file called WSSCmdlet.xml that contains all kind of cmdlets mapping like

  • Enable-SPFeature
  • New-SPContentDatabase
  • Get-SPFarm
  • Etc.

Shortly everything that you can do with SharePoint Application using PowerShell.

 

If you just want to quickly check what those files contains I’ve uploaded them to my github. I put there also more files like for Reporting Services, Workflows etc. You can check it here.

Have you found useful this tip? Maybe you know alternative way? Share it in comments!

Thanks & Have a great day! 🙂

 

Week 1/2018

Hey there!

Welcome in the first week of 2018. End of 2017 was quite busy but not only for me – I guess all IT world was focused on closing projects or budgets (polish companies close budgets on end of calendar year). In other words there is not much to update except maybe one thing:

  • SharePoint Online – personalized search from SharePoint home in Office 365. It includes multiple results (like sites, people, files) based on your activity and frequency.

That’s why I try not to focus only on MS updates but also on interesting articles from MS-IT world. Like below:

Script Wars: The Farce Awakens (part I)  – both amusing and informative posts about how to write powershell properly. Directly from MS PFE who is “strong in the ways of The Farce”.